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Sterba, Jim, 1943-
Nature Wars : The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds / Jim Sterba
Alternate Title Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds
New York : Broadway Books, 2013
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 3rd Floor  GF503 .S74 2013    MEL PAGED +1 HOLD
Subject(s) Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- United States
Nature conservation -- Social aspects -- United States
Wildlife conservation -- Social aspects -- United States
Wildlife rehabilitation -- Social aspects -- United States
Subject United States -- Environmental conditions
Physical Description xxiv, 343 pages : 20 cm
Note Originally published in hardcover in the United States by Crown Publishers, c2012
Includes blbliographical references (pages [329]-336) and index
Summary This may be hard to believe but it is very likely that more people live in closer proximity to more wild animals, birds and trees in the eastern United States today than anywhere on the planet at any time in history. For nature lovers, this should be wonderful news -- unless, perhaps, you are one of more than 4,000 drivers who will hit a deer today, your child's soccer field is carpeted with goose droppings, coyotes are killing your pets, the neighbor's cat has turned your bird feeder into a fast-food outlet, wild turkeys have eaten your newly-planted seed corn, beavers have flooded your driveway, or bears are looting your garbage cans. For 400 years, explorers, traders, and settlers plundered North American wildlife and forests in an escalating rampage that culminated in the late 19th century's "era of extermination." By 1900, populations of many wild animals and birds had been reduced to isolated remnants or threatened with extinction, and worry mounted that we were running out of trees. Then, in the 20th century, an incredible turnaround took place. Conservationists outlawed commercial hunting, created wildlife sanctuaries, transplanted isolated species to restored habitats and imposed regulations on hunters and trappers. Over decades, they slowly nursed many wild populations back to health. But after the Second World War something happened that conservationists hadn't foreseen: sprawl. People moved first into suburbs on urban edges, and then kept moving out across a landscape once occupied by family farms. By 2000, a majority of Americans lived in neither cities nor country but in that vast in-between. Much of sprawl has plenty of trees and its human residents offer up more and better amenities than many wild creatures can find in the wild: plenty of food, water, hiding places, and protection from predators with guns. The result is a mix of people and wildlife that should be an animal-lover's dream-come-true but often turns into a sprawl-dweller's nightmare

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