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Shoemaker, Stephen J., 1968-
The death of a prophet : the end of Muhammad's life and the beginnings of Islam / Stephen J. Shoemaker
Alternate Title End of Muhammad's life and the beginnings of Islam
1st ed
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 3rd Floor  BP55 .S46 2012    AVAILABLE
Subject(s) Islam -- History
Islam -- Historiography
Subject Muḥammad, Prophet, -632
Physical Description 408 p. ; 24 cm
Note Includes bibliographical references (p. [353]-390) and index
Contents "A prophet has appeared, coming with the Saracens": Muhammad's leadership during the conquest of Palestine according to seventh- and eighth-century sources -- The end of Muhammad's life in early Islamic memory: the witness of the Sīra tradition -- The beginnings of Islam and the end of days: Muhammad as eschatological prophet -- From believers to Muslims, from Jerusalem to the Ḥijāz: confessional identity and sacred geography in early Islam
Summary The oldest Islamic biography of Muhammad, written in the mid-eighth century, relates that the prophet died at Medina in 632, while earlier and more numerous Jewish, Christian, Samaritan, and even Islamic sources indicate that Muhammad survived to lead the conquest of Palestine, beginning in 634-35. Although this discrepancy has been known for several decades, Stephen J. Shoemaker here writes the first systematic study of the various traditions. Using methods and perspectives borrowed from biblical studies, Shoemaker concludes that these reports of Muhammad's leadership during the Palestinian invasion likely preserve an early Islamic tradition that was later revised to meet the needs of a changing Islamic self-identity. Muhammad and his followers appear to have expected the world to end in the immediate future, perhaps even in their own lifetimes, Shoemaker contends. When the eschatological Hour failed to arrive on schedule and continued to be deferred to an ever more distant point, the meaning of Muhammad's message and the faith that he established needed to be fundamentally rethought by his early followers. The larger purpose of The Death of a Prophet exceeds the mere possibility of adjusting the date of Muhammad's death by a few years; far more important to Shoemaker are questions about the manner in which Islamic origins should be studied. The difference in the early sources affords an important opening through which to explore the nature of primitive Islam more broadly. Arguing for greater methodological unity between the study of Christian and Islamic origins, Shoemaker emphasizes the potential value of non-Islamic sources for reconstructing the history of formative Islam. -- Product Description
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