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Shaffer, Brian W., 1960-
Reading the novel in English, 1950-2000 / Brian W. Shaffer
Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2006
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 4th Floor  PR881 .S53 2006    AVAILABLE
Subject(s) English fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism
English fiction -- Irish authors -- History and criticism
Commonwealth fiction (English) -- History and criticism
Subject English-speaking countries -- Intellectual life -- 20th century
SUBJECT Amis, Kingsley. Lucky Jim
Golding, William, 1911- Lord of the flies
Achebe, Chinua. Things fall apart
Spark, Muriel. Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea
Coetzee, J. M., 1940- Waiting for the barbarians
Atwood, Margaret Eleanor, 1939- Handmaid's tale
Ishiguro, Kazuo, 1954- Remains of the day
McCabe, Pat, 1955- Butcher boy
Swift, Graham, 1949- Last orders
Physical Description x, 264 p. ; 24 cm
Note Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-254) and index
Contents Introduction: contexts and concepts for reading the novel in English 1950-2000 -- Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim (1954) -- William Golding's Lord of the flies (1954) -- Chinua Achebe's Things fall apart (1958) -- Muriel Spark's The prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961) -- Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) -- J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the barbarians (1980) -- Margaret Atwood's The handmaid's tale (1985) -- Kazuo Ishiguro's The remains of the day (1989) -- Patrick McCabe's The butcher boy (1992) -- Graham Swift's Last orders (1996)
Review "Written in clear, jargon-free prose, this introductory text charts the variety of English-language novel writing in the second half of the twentieth century. It focuses equally on British and Irish novelists, and on Anglophone novelists from other countries (exclusive of the US)." "The text provides students both with strategies for interpretation and with fresh readings of ten influential novels. It maps out the most important contexts and concepts for understanding the fiction of the period, considering subjects such as the aftermath of literary modernism and the end of the British Empire."
Note "The author treats the English-language novel of this period as a socially-engaged and exploratory genre, one that challenges and stretches the prevailing canons of knowledge and literary representation in its bid to depict and probe an evolving present."--BOOK JACKET
NOTE 508422
Series Reading the novel

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