Mardigian Library
Ask a QuestionMy Library Account
Search Library Catalog - Books, DVDs & More
Limit to available
More Searches
   
Limit results to available items
Find more results:
Search MelCat
More Information
  
Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee on Prepositioned Medical Countermeasures for the Public
Prepositioning antibiotics for anthrax / Committee on Prepositioned Medical Countermeasures for the Public, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Clare Stroud ... [et al.], editors ; Institute of Medicine of the National Academies
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2012
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 4th Floor  RA644.A6 I577 2012    AVAILABLE
Subject(s) Anthrax -- United States -- Prevention
Biological warfare -- United States -- Safety measures -- Evaluation
Bioterrorism -- United States -- Prevention -- Evaluation
Physical Description xiv, 343 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 23 cm
Note Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents Antibiotics for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis -- Current dispensing strategies for medical countermeasures for anthrax -- Prepositioning strategies -- A decision-aiding framework -- Recommended actions for moving forward
Summary "If terrorists released Bacillus anthracis over a large city, hundreds of thousands of people could be at risk of the deadly disease anthrax-caused by the B. anthracis spores-unless they had rapid access to antibiotic medical countermeasures (MCM). Although plans for rapidly delivering MCM to a large number of people following an anthrax attack have been greatly enhanced during the last decade, many public health authorities and policy experts fear that the nation's current systems and plans are insufficient to respond to the most challenging scenarios, such as a very large-scale anthrax attack. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response commissioned the Institute of Medicine to examine the potential uses, benefits, and disadvantages of strategies for repositioning antibiotics. This involves storing antibiotics close to or in the possession of the people who would need rapid access to them should an attack occur. Prepositioning antibiotics for anthrax reviews the scientific evidence on the time window in which antibiotics successfully prevent anthrax and the implications for decision making about prepositioning, describes potential prepositioning strategies, and develops a framework to assist state, local, and tribal public health authorities in determining whether prepositioning strategies would be beneficial for their communities. However, based on an analysis of the likely health benefits, health risks, and relative costs of the different prepositioning strategies, the book also develops findings and recommendations to provide jurisdictions with some practical insights as to the circumstances in which different prepositioning strategies may be beneficial. Finally, the book identifies federal- and national-level actions that would facilitate the evaluation and development of prepositioning strategies. Recognizing that communities across the nation have differing needs and capabilities, the findings presented in this report are intended to assist public health officials in considering the benefits, costs, and trade-offs involved in developing alternative prepositioning strategies appropriate to their particular communities."--Publisher's description
Note Also available in Open Book format via the National Academies Press home page
Alternate Author Stroud, Clare
Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Board on Health Sciences Policy

Mardigian Library, 4901 Evergreen Rd.
Dearborn, MI 48128-1491 313-593-5400 fax 313-593-5561
ask-a-question@umd.umich.edu
The Regents of the University of Michigan | Non-Discrimination Policy
Copyright © The University of Michigan - Dearborn • 4901 Evergreen Road • Dearborn, Michigan 48128 • 313-593-5000
The University of Michigan - Ann Arbor | The University of Michigan - Flint | SITEMAP | DIRECTORY | CONTACT