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Boyd-Judson, Lyn, 1964-
Strategic moral diplomacy : understanding the enemy's moral universe / Lyn Boyd-Judson
Alternate Title Understanding the enemy's moral universe
Sterling, VA : Kumarian Press, c2011
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 3rd Floor  JZ1480 .B644 2011    AVAILABLE
Subject United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 -- Moral and ethical aspects
United States -- Foreign relations -- 1989- -- Moral and ethical aspects
Subject(s) Diplomacy -- Moral and ethical aspects
Physical Description xv, 198 p. ; 24 cm
Note Includes bibliographical references (p. 173-183) and index
Contents Introduction: Defining Strategic Moral Diplomacy. 1. The Enemy's Moral Universe --- 2. Absolutism Versus Relativism Is Not the Question or the Answer --- 3. Critical Caveats ---4. Four Case Studies --- 5. Overview of the Chapters ---- Part I. Strategic Moral Diplomacy in Theory. . Conventional Wisdom: Moral Misperception --- 2. Rules of Moral Salience: An Alternative to Conventional Wisdom --- 3. Moral Tensions with World Order --- 4. Political Decision Making: Embedded in Cognitive Moral Metaphors --- 5. Rational Choice and Bounded Rationality --- 6. Constructions of Ethical Norms and International justice ---- Part II. Exile of a King: Rules of Moral and Legal Salience. 1. A Special Relationship --- 2. King of Kings --- 3. A Flying Dutchman --- 4. Mexico Offers an Invitation --- 5. A Matter of Principle --- 6. Humanitarian Considerations --- 7. The Making of a Crisis --- 8. Hamilton Jordan and the General --- 9. A Question of Extradition --- 10. Legal Issues --- 11. Back to Panama and the Question of Extradition --- 12. Sadat's Stand --- 13. Rules of Moral and Legal Salience ---- Part III. The Lockerbie Negotiations: Granting the Enemy a Moral Universe. 1. Mandela and Qaddafi: Commonalities and Differences --- 2. Background --- 3. Pan Am Flight 103 --- 4. Jim Swire's Mission --- 5. Reasonable Fears: Nelson Mandela's Moral Capital --- 6. Calling Bluffs --- 7. Clarifications --- 8. Take It or Leave It --- 9. And the Beat Goes On --- 10. Analysis: Granting the Enemy's Moral Universe ---- Part VI. Haiti's Generals: Reframing Fixed Conflict Situations. 1. Lost in Translation --- 2. The Coup from Above and Below --- 3. Lavalas and Its Aftermath --- 4. A Radical Priest and a Reluctant General --- 5. The Priest --- 6. The General --- 7. The Military in Haitian Society: Problems and Context --- 8. International Reaction to the Coup --- 9. Governor's Island --- 10. Is the Bird Alive or Dead? --- 11. Batten Down the Hatches --- 12. A Dream Team: Carter, Nunn, and Powell --- 13. The Kitchen Cabinet --- 14. The Stick: Black Hawk Helicopters on the Way --- 15. Of Amnesty and Exile --- 16. Postscript --- 17. Analysis: Reframing Fixed-Conflict Situations ---- Part V. Zimbabwe's Land Seizures: Just Claims and Avoidable Losses.3 1. From Ndebele to Rhodesia --- 2. Robert Mugabe: An Unlikely Revolutionary --- 3. From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe: The Lancaster Agreement --- 4. Gukurahundi --- 5. Britain's Big Blunder --- 6. Economic Problems --- 7. South Africa: Between a Rock and a Hard Place --- 8. The West and the Rest --- 9. Analysis: Just Claims and Avoidable Losses ---- Part VI. Conclusion. 1. Strategic Moral Diplomacy's Contributions --- 2. Closing Comments
Summary Strategic Moral Diplomacy addresses the most critical political problem of our time: how to negotiate seemingly incompatible moral values between nations. Normative and rational choice theories tend to simplify the actions and motives of leaders at the best, and paint enemies as immoral or evil at the worst. Boyd-Judson argues that it can be both strategically useful, as well as ethical, to assume an enemy has just moral concerns and give these claims credence. Boyd-Judson uses the ITS and UN negotiations with Iran, Libya, Zimbabwe and Haiti to illustrate the practical application of strategic moral diplomacy. Through personal interviews with negotiators and those close to them, she unearths the complex moral positions held by those involved and arrives at workable suggestions for future diplomatic dilemmas. Critical to the education of global citizens and future diplomats, Strategic Moral Diplomacy is an irreplaceable teaching tool for discussing social justice, rogue states, and the importance of understanding moral psychology in international relations. -- Back cover

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