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Brynjolfsson, Erik
Wired for innovation : how information technology is reshaping the economy / Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2010
book jacket
Location Call Number Status
 3rd Floor  HC79.T4 B79 2010    AVAILABLE
Subject(s) Technological innovations -- Economic aspects
Physical Description xvii, 154 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
Note Includes bibliographical references (p. [135]-148) and index
Contents Technology, innovation, and productivity in the information age -- Measuring the information economy -- IT's contributions to productivity and economic growth -- Business practices that enhance productivity -- Organizational capital -- Incentives for innovation in the information economy -- Consumer surplus -- Frontier research opportunities
Summary A wave of business innovation is driving the productivity resurgence in the U.S. economy. In Wired for Innovation, Erik Brynjolfsson and Adam Saunders describe how information technology directly or indirectly created this productivity explosion, reversing decades of slow growth. They argue that the companies with the highest level of returns to their technology investment are doing more than just buying technology; they are inventing new forms of organizational capital to become digital organizations. These innovations include a cluster of organizational and business-process changes, including broader sharing of information, decentralized decision-making, linking pay and promotions to performance, pruning of non-core products and processes, and greater investments in training and education. Brynjolfsson and Saunders go on to examine the real sources of value in the emerging information economy, including intangible inputs and outputs that have defied traditional metrics. For instance, intangible organizational capital is not directly observable on a balance sheet yet amounts to trillions of dollars of value. Similarly, such nonmarket transactions of information goods as Google searches or views of Wikipedia articles are an increasingly large share of the economy yet virtually invisible in the GDP statistics
Alternate Author Saunders, Adam

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